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Podcast: Micki Kaufman on Quantifying Kissinger | Scholars— Lab

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Yeah, that's an interesting point, especially given what we're tasked with for our final project! If it is the case that digital history work is biased toward starting with any large amount of data and mining it for whatever you can find, then the type of work digital historians do will always be constrained by the type of data that's available for distant reading. I don't think this is entirely the case, but it's definitely something to consider.

Curated by catherinesupplecraig.



Topic Modeling the Colonial Newspaper Database

Here’s a stoplist you can use http://bridge.library.wisc.edu/jockersStopList.txt

This link redirects and I couldn't find the original text file by googling, but the full stoplist is available on his website here http://www.matthewjockers.net/macroanalysisbook/expanded-stopwords-list/ I just copied and pasted into my text editor and saved as a .txt file

Curated by catherinesupplecraig.



Exercises - HIST3814o Crafting Digital History

Basic Text Mining in R

I think this link is broken

Curated by catherinesupplecraig.



MappingTexts_WhitePaper.pdf

The age of abundance, it turns out, can simply overwhelm researchers, as the sheer volume of available digitized historical newspapers is beginning to do

I find this paradox interesting - that an abundance of data could actually ultimately result in less accurate or meaningful information.

Curated by catherinesupplecraig.



MappingTexts_WhitePaper.pdf

The broader purpose behind this effort has been to help scholars develop new toolsfor coping effectively with the growing challenge of doing research in the age of abundance, as the rapid pace of mass digitization of historical sources continues to pick up speed. Historical records of all kinds are becoming increasingly available in electronic forms, and there may be no set of records becoming available in larger quantities than digitized historical newspapers.

This section is a nice summary of a lot of the issues that we've discussed over the past couple weeks, particularly in module 2 and 3

Curated by catherinesupplecraig.



‘Q i-jtb the Raven’: Taking Dirty OCR Seriously

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I really like this point and I think there's a parallel here between the evolution of a text and the evolution of language. It's entirely possible that the bits of code that go into formatting a markdown file will be as legible to people in the future as an apostrophe is to someone today.

Curated by catherinesupplecraig.



‘Q i-jtb the Raven’: Taking Dirty OCR Seriously

dirty OCR illuminates the priorities, infrastructure, and economics of the academy in the late 20th and early 21st centuries.

This reminds me of the Coding History podcast from last week and Ian Milligan's remarks on Geocities. Today's google search result is tomorrow's history!

Curated by catherinesupplecraig.



‘Q i-jtb the Raven’: Taking Dirty OCR Seriously

The consequences of “errorful” OCR files, to borrow a term from computer science, influence our research in ways by now well expounded by humanities scholars, inhibiting, for instance, comprehensive search

Thinking about the consequences of technology that produces "errorful" work is definitely interesting, but I think it's important to keep in mind that tech which produces seemingly errorless work should be scrutinized just as much. Maybe I'm being too cynical, but if I got a perfect piece of OCR I think I'd wonder what was left out in the process of making it so clear.

Curated by catherinesupplecraig.



‘Q i-jtb the Raven’: Taking Dirty OCR Seriously

Where did it come from, and how did it come to be?

It's interesting to think of the digital object itself as an artifact, rather than just a copy

Curated by catherinesupplecraig.



Open Refine - HIST3814o Crafting Digital History

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When you saved your original index.txt file in nano did you add sender, recipient, date to the top first? Maybe it has something to do with the way that line was formatted.

Curated by catherinesupplecraig.



The Perpetual Sunrise of Methodology

To that end, I published an online component that charted the article’s digital approach and presented a series of interactive maps.

There seems to be a line in the sand drawn here between traditional academic audiences and more digitally-savvy audiences. I wonder if the trouble with reconciling these two groups has anything to do with the challenges of introducing complex methodological techniques to scholars who might be intimidated or feel entrenched in their own methods

Curated by catherinesupplecraig.



The Perpetual Sunrise of Methodology

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That's an interesting point. I think there's also something in the idea that certain topics which might seem mundane from a more micro perspective can actually turn out to be interesting when you take a broader perspective.

Curated by catherinesupplecraig.



The Perpetual Sunrise of Methodology

It’s that there is a fundamental imbalance between the proliferation of digital history workshops, courses, grants, institutes, centers, and labs over the past decade, and the impact this has had in terms of generating scholarly claims and interpretations.

I wonder if this bias has anything to do with the fact that digital labour often seems invisible from the outside. I imagine most historians can appreciate the work that goes into physical searches for data and transcribing sources, but in a culture that's conditioned to think of 'digital' as synonymous with 'instantaneous' (thinking of google search results for instance, or just search functions in general) maybe it's harder to recognize the amount of work that goes into developing and executing these methods, and therefore producing academic work that follows these techniques appears less prestigious

Curated by catherinesupplecraig.



The Perpetual Sunrise of Methodology

The scholarship tent has gotten bigger, and that’s a good thing.

This is one of the things I find most exciting about digital humanities work. The 'scholarship tent' is now starting to include many different disciplines, and thinking about how the tools that digital humanities scholars use could be applied to other fields is really exciting.

Curated by catherinesupplecraig.



The Perpetual Sunrise of Methodology

Seven years later the digital turn has, in fact, revolutionized how we study history. Public history has unequivocally led the charge, using innovative approaches to archiving, exhibiting, and presenting the past in order to engage a wider public. Other historians have built powerful digital tools, explored alternative publication models, and generated online resources to use in the classroom.

It's pretty neat to consider how quickly these new research methods have come into use

Curated by catherinesupplecraig.



Seams and edges: Dreams of aggregation, access & discovery in a broken world

A seam-free service is one that maximises ease-of-use.

Hmm, but at what cost? Google has ease-of-use down pat, but I have to wonder what kind of concessions you make as a user (without necessarily realizing) in terms of the kind of information you're receiving.

Curated by catherinesupplecraig.



Academic Journals: The Most Profitable Obsolete Technology in History

“For Elsevier it is very hard to purchase specific journals—either you buy everything or you buy nothing,” says Vincent Lariviere, a professor at Université de Montréal. Lariviere finds that his university uses 20 percent of the journals they subscribe to and 80 percent are never downloaded.

This seems like a double-edged sword to me - on the one hand, obviously there's a financial incentive to create more and more journals that universities and libraries will then be obliged to buy according to this system, but on the other hand, the creation of more journals means more opportunity for academics to get published...which I guess leads to a whole other conversation about the premium placed on academic publishing as a form of accreditation.

Curated by catherinesupplecraig.



My Digital Publishing Update: Nothing

As Director 0f University of Michigan Press I’m afraid to say that everything you say in this post, Sheila, is true. We’ve struggled over the last few years to bring innovative digital projects into the mainstream press workflow, and you’ve been caught in the middle.

I have to say, seeing this comment is one of the most interesting parts of this article for me! There really seems to be a contrast here between what Michelle Moravac suggests regarding writing in public as a means of countering isolation in academic writing and Sheila Brennan's experience of increased isolation from the academic community as a result of creating work publicly.

Curated by catherinesupplecraig.



Generous Thinking: Introduction

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Such a great example! I'd never really thought about how the humanities are politicized like that. The periodic controversies over lack of diversity in school literature curriculums are another example that comes to mind.

Curated by catherinesupplecraig.



Exercises - HIST3814o Crafting Digital History

Then change directory into it

This is a bit awkwardly worded. It took me a second to understand what the instruction was.

Curated by catherinesupplecraig.